It’s here!

It’s here!

A Day in the Life of Digital Humanities 2011 finally popped up. After two intriguing years in 2009 and 2010, I will participate in the 2011 version. As a slight departure, this year I will instead be blogging during a conference rather than on a teaching day, which is odd after two years of extremely intense teaching days being chronicled. Let’s see what kind of DH trouble I can stir up on the politics, feminism and editing panel at STS11 (led by the effervescent Matt Kirschenbaum).

I offered up the opportunity to participate in Day of DH to my Death of Print Culture Digital Literature Honors students (Fall 2010) too. A student who is trying to wade through the massive history and constant flux of this field needs to have a voice, some place to respond, ask questions, or declare himself/herself a Digital Humanist (or not!).  My focus this past year has been more on Digital Humanities and pedagogy not only because the field is opening up with all kinds of opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, but also because it needs to breath, get away from tenure and promotion battles, stop trying to save the Humanities — instead, just play, or as some other esteemed colleagues have already mentioned, less yack, more hack. Students bring this to the table, as Cathy Davidson has so eloquently and doggedly proved with her experiments in crowd-sourced grading and more; and as Rebecca Frost Davis demanded in her Texas Institute for Learning and Teaching presentation (which I’m sure will be reprized as a pre-conference seminar at this year’s Digital Humanities Conference right down the street from me on Stanford University’s campus).

Watch that WordPress blog space for all of the (non)DHers to surprise us.